Under Santa Fe Skies

by Susan Tungate

It Snowed Last Night

It snowed last night, and for just a bit of time, before the dirt and the slush and the traffic, the world was transformed.

Quan Yin

Canyon Road #1

Canyon Road #2

Canyon Road #3

Mardi Gras Parrot

 

 

 

92nd Annual Santa Fe Indian Market: The Crescendo of Summer

copyright SWAIA

The end of summer in Santa Fe is a bit like the grand finale of a firework extravaganza on the Fourth of July. The events of the summer build and build until kaboom!, mid August hits and it is  time for Santa Fe Indian Market week.

Surrounding  Indian Market, Santa Fe is filled with gallery openings and trunk shows for everything from art to hand tooled custom boots and handbags to turquoise jewelry in every shade from green to light blue to, well, turquoise.

The 92nd Annual Santa Fe Indian Market will be held on the Plaza this Saturday 7a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sunday 8a.m. to 5p.m. I like to arrive early on Saturday before 7a.m., before the crowds, just to feel the excitement and anticipation of the over 1,000 artists from all over North America who are showing their pottery, paintings, jewelry, textiles, beadwork, baskets and sculpture, some traditional, some contemporary. Grab an Indian taco or fry bread and forget the guilt because this is tradition, watch a fashion show, watch little bitty sweet faced kids and big kids wearing traditional native clothes, listen to the music and feel a part of a 92 year old Santa Fe tradition and so many more years of Native American heritage.

And breathe deeply because this is also chile roasting time in New Mexico, another part of the crescendo of summer. Hermes’ Eau de Merveilles cannot compare to the sensual fragrance of fresh roasted chiles. Just can’t.

This week explodes with the fullness of summer and the joy of being present for the cycle of tradition in Santa Fe.

Eat, Pray, Write, Relax: A Rejuvenating Weekend in Santa Fe

 

It’s Spring! What better time and what better place than Santa Fe to nurture, center, and revitalize body, mind and spirit than a weekend in April or May immersed in the inspirational beauty of Santa Fe, New Mexico. My friend and Southwest tour guide extraordinaire Patrizia Antonicelli, who owns Seven Directions Tours, is offering this Santa Fe experience in April and May.

Offered the weekends of  April 13-14, April 27-28, May 11-12, and May 25-26, the Seven Directions Tours experience begins on Saturday morning at 10:00 a.m. with my writing class “Writing Your Memoir: One Vivid Story at a Time.”


Memoir writing offers you the opportunity to observe the past with fresh eyes, reflect on your life purpose, clarify your future path and preserve your unique stories. Always with humor, I promise to demystify the process of memoir writing and provide the simple tools you need to begin. The class will end at noon.

From 3:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m., you will be immersed in Native American culture by spending this afternoon with a Native American healer who will offer a blessing and healing ceremony which is sure to nourish and renew the spirit.

Saturday dinner, held from 6:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m., will be a memorable experience. A premiere Native American chef will prepare centuries old traditional dishes for you in her home using organic ingredients. The history of each dish will be explained. To end the evening, her Navajo sous chef will drum and sing for you.

Sunday morning from 10:00 a.m. to noon will be spent writing with me.

The experience will end Sunday afternoon with an herbal massage and flower and mineral essences with the Native American healer. Massage sessions will begin at 2:00 p.m. You will return home with flower and mineral essences as a remembrance of this special weekend.

I urge you to make this peaceful, revitalizing weekend a gift to yourself. Patrizia will not disappoint, and I would love to write with you. Locals are welcome to join in, too.  You may even get to meet the beautiful and talented Georgia the Dog!

You will stay in town at a typical southwestern accommodation. Upon request, for this weekend, Seven Directions Tours will provide ideas and itineraries for anyone wanting also to enjoy the beautiful surroundings and the art and culture for which Santa Fe is famous.

For further information and media inquiries call Patrizia Antonicelli at 505.820.3305 or visit www.sevendirections.net .

A Time Out of Time Weekend to Rejuvenate and Revitalize in Timeless Santa Fe

(My friend and Southwest tour guide extraordinaire Patrizia Antonicelli, who owns Seven Directions Tours, is offering this Santa Fe experience in December. Please consider making this peaceful retreat a gift to yourself or a special friend. Patrizia will not disappoint, and I would love to see you in December. Locals are welcome to join in, too.)

The end of another hectic year is near. The New Year is soon upon us. What better time and what better place to nurture, center, and revitalize body, mind and spirit, than a weekend in December immersed in the inspirational beauty of Santa Fe, New Mexico.

Offered the weekends of  December 15-16 and 29-30, the Seven Directions Tours experience begins on Saturday morning at 10:00 a.m. with the class “Writing Your Memoir: One Vivid Story at a Time” taught by Susan Tungate. Susan is an author, teacher, an inspirational Guide for “Architects of Change” on mariashriver.com, and former attorney with CNN.

Memoir writing offers you the opportunity to observe the past with fresh eyes, reflect on your life purpose, clarify your future path and preserve your unique stories. Always with humor, Susan will demystify the process of memoir writing and provide the simple tools the client needs to begin. The class will end at noon.

From 3:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m., you will be immersed in Native American culture by spending this afternoon with a Native American healer who will offer a blessing and healing ceremony which is sure to nourish and renew the spirit.

Saturday dinner, held from 6:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m., will be a memorable experience. A premiere Native American chef will prepare centuries old traditional dishes for you in her home using organic ingredients. The history of each dish will be explained. To end the evening, her Navajo sous chef will drum and sing for you.

Sunday morning from 10:00 a.m. to noon will be spent writing with Susan. The experience will end Sunday afternoon with an herbal massage and flower and mineral essences with the Native American healer. Massage sessions will begin at 2:00 p.m. You will return home with flower and mineral essences as a remembrance of this special weekend.

What better gift to give yourself or a special friend  than the gift of a peaceful retreat, a moment out of time in timeless Santa Fe, to renew the spirit and meet the New Year refreshed and enlivened.

You will stay in town at a typical southwestern accommodation. Upon request, for this weekend, Seven Directions Tours will provide ideas and itineraries for anyone wanting also to enjoy the beautiful surroundings and the art and culture for which Santa Fe is famous.

For further information and media inquiries call Patrizia Antonicelli at 505.820.3305 or visit www.sevendirections.net.

The Raven

I returned home one late afternoon to find a baby raven hopping down the middle of the driveway. Baby must have fallen out of the nest in the tall evergreen tree over the house. An adult raven, let’s call her Mom, sat on the fence squawking at the little one. What to do. The neighborhood is full of cats. Baby would be dinner if I did not help her.

I managed to maneuver Baby into the patio as Mom swooped and screamed, warning me to do the right thing because she was ready to take my eyes out if I harmed a feather. Once Baby was at least semi safe, I ran inside and Googled “what do ravens and crows eat” and “helping baby raven” or something like that. Turns out Harry the Cat’s canned beef would work just fine.

Baby’s first big leap was into the Napoleonic era Oeil de Boeuf  leaning against the coyote fence. Baby has great taste in French antiques.

Baby served as evening entertainment for Harry the Cat, Georgia the Dog and me. When I last saw her before bed, Baby was huddled between the fence and the shed. I wished her a safe evening and hoped she would not meet the cat next door.

The next morning Baby had progressed to the top of the bistro chair. Mom watched from a limb of the bean tree.

I watched as Baby hopped down from one chair and scaled another which was right under Mom’s limb.

At this point Baby started screaming. Right on cue another larger raven, let’s call him Dad, came out of a high limb of the evergreen, swooped  down and into the open mouth of Baby delivered breakfast.

This pattern was repeated for two more days. Baby screamed. Dad made a special delivery. Mom hovered. Baby’s wings grew stronger until she was able to make a rocky landing on top of the coyote fence where she would just hang out.

On the third morning I came outside and Baby was gone. I looked in the adjacent yard. I looked around the house. No Baby. I sat down on the patio step, thanked them all for letting me have this glimpse into their lives and wished them well. Right then, and I am not kidding, Mom swooped in and landed on her perch on the limb of the bean tree. Then a small raven made a very rocky landing next to her, followed by the arrival of a large raven. Mom, Baby and Dad sat there for 15 seconds, then all flew away.

For the Native Americans, raven medicine, their message to humans, is to inform us that we must become comfortable in our inner world in order to experience a change of consciousness. As stated by Keshi, a local store which sells Zuni fetishes, “Raven is comfortable there and offers us the opportunity to discover the personal fears and demons that are keeping us from our awakening and our magic. The black color of the feathers of Raven contain all colors, evoking creativity, not negativity. Raven medicine can help us to really look at the issues that frighten, anger and thwart us. Doing this can lead to understanding and integration so that the negative energy is magically lifted.” To that I say a big thank you to the ravens.

And a post script. Almost every day this summer, often in the morning and some days in the late afternoon, a raven sits on the limb of the bean tree for a minute or two.

 

A Harvest Celebration at Tiwa Kitchen

Po’Pay Society Directors

Fall in New Mexico is my favorite season. The aspen trees burst with yellow leaves along the highway to the north. The air is crisp and chilled in the morning. The chile roasters run overtime. Fall is also the season of special regional festivals and art tours which foster community and camaraderie. This Saturday, September 29, from 3pm to 5pm, you have the chance to combine the beautiful drive to Taos with one such event, The Harvest Celebration sponsored by the Po’Pay Society. What is the Po’Pay Society and why should you support their efforts? I will tell you.

In 2009, musician Robert Mirabal and Nelson Zink founded Tiwa Farms, an organization promoting agriculture at Taos Pueblo. In 2012, Tiwa Farms morphed into a new nonprofit organization, the Po’Pay Society. The Society is dedicated to the memory of Po’Pay, who was the leader of the Pueblo Rebellion of 1680 and champion of the Pueblo way of life.

The focus of the Society is on Pueblo agriculture. This year it plowed and planted 25 corn fields at Taos Pueblo with heritage seeds. The Society also aims to engage the youth of the Taos Pueblo in traditional farming practices.

You, dear readers, are invited to join the Po’Pay Society at Tiwa Kitchen, located on 328 Veteran’s Highway which is the road out to the Taos Pueblo, for traditional food, a report on Po’Pay Society activities, and the release of Po’Pay Speaks, a CD recording of Robert Mirabal’s dramatic monologue.

This is a special event supporting an important purpose. Now you know what I will be doing this Saturday afternoon. Hope to see you there.

Directors appearing in the photograph: Nelson Zink ,Henry Lujan, Chelona Edgerly, and Stephen Parks.

Santo Domingo Labor Day Pueblo Market

Yesterday the Santo Domingo Pueblo held its Labor Day Pueblo Market, which is a social event rather than a feast day. While I was unable to attend, my friend the artist and jewelry designer Catherine Trapani did. By her good graces I have photos of the event to share with you.

There were corn dancers,

©Catherine Trapani

and a hoop dancer,

©Catherine Trapani

singers,

©Catherine Trapani

and Kewa, Navajo, Jemez and Zuni artists.

Seems to me Catherine’s favorite part was meeting one of the disabled Native American veterans whose face turned from this

©Catherine Trapani

to this after chatting just a few minutes with her.  A nice day.

©Catherine Trapani